Blog THIS IS WHERE I TALK ABOUT MY THOUGHTS & PERSONAL EXPERIENCE

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Hi, can you see this?

If you can see this post now, it probably means my website is up and running… and I’m ready to share it with the internet. Feel free to browse around and stay tuned for my next upcomming post soon!

Here are a few credits to that helped me achive building this site:

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Glue Languages

Glue languages are used everywhere. While you may identify as a Python, Java, Haskell or C/C++ developer, we all eventually end up congregating in some common spaces. On the web side of things of all these languages is JavaScript. On the server, this means shell/bash. These are our glue languages: languages that bring our ever so divided programming communities together.

JavaScript, shell scripting, SQL, and other glue languages like them are ubiquitous. Grab and Unix based computer and box and dive right in with a shell script. JavaScript, is allowing people to push the envelope both on the client as well as the server. No matter what language you primarily develop in, improving your skills in these common-ground scripting languages is one of the best things you can do for yourself.

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OSX is not the only great development platform

Stack Overflow reports that that more developers now use OS X than Linux or Windows as their primary OS, and that trend is slowly increasing as less than fewer developers will be using Windows next year and the year after that.

Personally, I think there is a slew of reasons, including its growth, but a larger part being the migration of developers from Windows to OSX who drink, breath, and live Starbucks for a living and deem themselves to be hipsters. Attracted by the UNIX subsystem under the hood, beautiful aesthetics, and straightforward usability approach, more and more coders, adopted OSX as their primary machine.

This migration wasn’t just for Objective-C coders, the language that OSX was primarily was written in. Languages such as Java, C/C++, Python, Ruby and other communities were slowly implemented into the OSX. Apple in newer builds, installed most of the languages, as default with the OSX and lowered the barriers for the technically inclined to code.

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